Question: 5. OK, Let’s Think About Membranes For A Minute, Whether It’s The Cell Membrane Or That Of An Organelle. Membranes As A Whole Serve Certain Functions (you Should Know These). But Let’s Think About The Major Component Of Any Membrane, Which Is The Phospholipid. A. Which Component Of The Phospholipid – The Phosphate End OR The Fatty Acid Chain – Contributes …

Question: 5. OK, Let’s Think About Membranes For A Minute, Whether It’s The Cell Membrane Or That Of An Organelle. Membranes As A Whole Serve Certain Functions (you Should Know These). But Let’s Think About The Major Component Of Any Membrane, Which Is The Phospholipid. A. Which Component Of The Phospholipid – The Phosphate End OR The Fatty Acid Chain – Contributes …

5. OK, lets think about membranes for a minute, whether its the cell membrane or that of an organelle. Membranes as a whole

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5. OK, let’s think about membranes for a minute, whether it’s the cell membrane or that of an organelle. Membranes as a whole serve certain functions (you should know these). But let’s think about the major component of any membrane, which is the phospholipid. a. Which component of the phospholipid – the phosphate end OR the fatty acid chain – contributes more to ability of the membrane to serve as a barrier? Hint: think about what can and cannot use simple diffusion to cross the membrane. b. OK, now explain why anything can diffuse (simply) across the barrier even though there is both a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic component to the barrier. Shouldn’t the hydrophobic portion be able to keep out hydrophilic particles and vice versa such that nothing can diffuse across??? Why is one component a ‘barrier’ and the other isn’t? Deeper Dive for Unit 1, Page 2 of 7 6. The number of mitochondria possessed by cells can vary widely. Why? What can you predict about cells with many mitochondria compared to cells with fewer mitochondria?