Question: Please Note This Project Was Posted 4 Times So Far With No Answers, This Is All The Information I Have. Ok, If You Think The Results Will Be The Same We Can Use Coins

Question: Please Note This Project Was Posted 4 Times So Far With No Answers, This Is All The Information I Have. Ok, If You Think The Results Will Be The Same We Can Use Coins

Please note this project was posted 4 times so far with noanswers, this is all the information I have.

Cancer Cells Experiment M&M Lab (Exponential Growth and Decay) DO NOT EAT THE M&Ms UNTIL YOU ARE DONE COLLECTING ALL DATA Pa

Cancer Cells Experiment 4) Make a scatterplot of your data with the trial number on the x-axis and the number of M&Ms (cance

Cancer Cells Experiment 7) Continue this process and fill in the table. You are done when you have completed 10 phases - OR-s

Cancer Cells Experiment Part III: Modeling Exponential Growth of Cancerous Cells Use your data and graphs from Part 1 of your

Ok, if you think the results will be the same we can usecoins

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Cancer Cells Experiment M&M Lab (Exponential Growth and Decay) DO NOT EAT THE M&M’s UNTIL YOU ARE DONE COLLECTING ALL DATA Part I: Modeling Exponential Growth of Cancerous Cells The purpose of this lab is to provide a simple model to illustrate exponential growth of cancerous cells. In our experiment, an M&M represents a cancerous cell. If the M&M lands “M” up, the cell divides into the “parent” cell and daughter” cell. The cancerous cells divide like this uncontrollably-without end. We will conduct up to 15 trials and record the number of “cancerous cells” on the plate. Exponential Growth Procedure: 1) Place 2 M&M’s in a cup. This is trial number 0. 2) Shake the cup and dump out the M&Ms. For every M&M with the “M” showing, add another M&M and then record the new population. (Ex. If 5 M&Ms land face up, then you add 5 more M&Ms to the cup.) 3) Repeat step number 2 until you are done with 15 trials OR until you run out of M&Ms. Trial # 0 1 N 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 2. # of M&M’s (# of cells Cancer Cells Experiment 4) Make a scatterplot of your data with the trial number on the x-axis and the number of M&M’s (cancerous cells) on the y-axis. Number of M&M’s * Trial Number Part II: Modeling Exponential Decay of Chemotherapy Treatment According to Skipper’s Law, chemotherapy follows an exponential-kill model, meaning a constant percentage of cells are killed with the treatment, regardless of tumor size. Exponential Decay Procedure 5) Count the total number of M&Ms that you have. Record this number in trial #0. 6) This time when you shake the cup and dump out the M&Ms, remove the M&Ms with the “M” showing. Record the M&M population. Cancer Cells Experiment 7) Continue this process and fill in the table. You are done when you have completed 10 phases – OR-stop once your M&M population gets below 4. Do NOT record 0 as the population! Trial 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 M&M Population 8) Make a scatterplot representing your data Number of M&M’S Trial Number Cancer Cells Experiment Part III: Modeling Exponential Growth of Cancerous Cells Use your data and graphs from Part 1 of your experiment to answer the following questions: 1) Should your graph touch the x-axis? Why or why not? 2) We can use a graphing calculator to write the exponential growth equation. Type your data into the lists on your calculator, and write the equation of the exponential regression ( y = ab) below. 3) What does each number (a, b, x, and y) represent in the equation above represent for our real-world model? 4) Write down the correlation coefficient (r) for the equation you found in # 2. What does that tell you about your regression model? 5) Use your exponential growth regression that you found in #2 to predict the number of “cancerous cells” there would be in each trial below. Show your work (or what you typed into the calculator). Trial 25 Trial 50 6) What would these predictions mean to you if you were a patient with cancer?